The Honking Goose

something to honk about

the solar system is twisted

This is the most beautiful, mind-bending thing I have seen all week.

It makes me wonder why I never learned this in school. WTF? Is it because without three dimensional modeling it was hard to understand and make sense of? It seems like an important and significant difference from the way I learned to picture our solar system.

sun and planets

Yet another example of something that I learned in school, that I have to relearn later in life (or later in school). Remember when they taught us that Columbus discovered America? And then many years later we learned that Vikings traveled to the Americas first? Well, I guess it is in keeping with my theme this week of learning new information and changing my mind.

What is something that blew your mind and changed the way you see the world when you learned it?

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68 comments on “the solar system is twisted

  1. Susan
    November 18, 2016

    When I finished pediatric courses in nursing school and learned how many muscles, bones, and neurons were in the human body. Giving birth to a human being was fully understood for the miracle it was!

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 18, 2016

      That is so cool. Plus our bodies are home to so many living organisms too, it’s like a world unto itself.

      Like

  2. grevisangel73
    October 28, 2016

    Most of American history is not what we think, or have been taught.

    Like

  3. michelle213norton
    October 15, 2016

    I think the thing that changed my perception about life the most was experiencing the imperfectness of my own memory. It helps me to question if I really know something.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Swarn Gill
    November 20, 2014

    Thought you might find these pictures interesting. ๐Ÿ™‚ http://www.buzzfeed.com/daves4/the-universe-is-scary

    Like

  5. Kimberly
    November 10, 2014

    Here’s my reply:

    Check it out!

    Like

  6. Swarn Gill
    November 10, 2014

    It’s a cool graphic, but the video is a little misleading in two ways.

    1) What you were taught in schools isn’t wrong. It all depends on your reference frame. Since we are in motion a long with our galaxy, from our perspective the orbit of the planets looks exactly like you were taught in school. The video shows the sun in motion moving past a back ground of stars, but all of the stars we can see in the sky are in the Milky Way and are all moving along with us. The sun would only appear in motion against the background of distant galaxies. Since only a couple galaxies can even seen with the naked eye and are still very far away, our motion against that background could not really be seen. The motion showed in the video would be from the perspective of someone outside our galaxy. The video also didn’t seem to take into account the fact we are also in motion revolving around the center of the milky way so the path of the sun itself is technically not moving in a straight line. Also the video uses the incorrect terminology saying the planets rotate around the sun, but revolve is the correct term. Planets still do orbit/revolve around the sun in the manner in which we are taught. The relevant physics to their orbit is the gravity well created by the sun and a stable orbit is possible even if the galaxy was not in motion.

    2) The comparison of this spiraling motion to other things in nature that spiral is not really a relevant comparison. The spiraling of the planets is a spiral created through a combination of motions superimposed upon each other, where is the other spirals are due to some evolutionary pattern. There are plenty of things that do not spiral in nature as well. Most galaxies in fact are not spiral galaxies like ours.

    It’s not that it’s not cool to consider the fact that we are on a rotate planet, orbit around a sun, which is orbiting around the center of the milky way, that is hurtling through the galaxy, but I found the video a little bit unscientific. I did actually learn it in school, it’s just that the superposition of motions was a difficult thing to animate back in my day so you just had to know about all these motions, but it was hard to picture what it was like. It’s nice that we have the technology now to give people a little bit of a view of what things might look like observing from outside our galaxy. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 10, 2014

      Thank you – as usual, your thoughtful, intelligent response is very informative. I didn’t bother to research the accuracy of this video because a) I liked it very much and I didn’t want it to be wrong and b) laziness. But I am super grateful that you have dropped by to further discuss and enlighten. I also thought the comparison to other spirals in nature was just slapped on the end there without justification or direct relationship. I hope I am not doing a disservice to readers by sharing this video. I still think it is a fun animation that gives us a different way of visualizing the planets and our relationship to the sun.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Swarn Gill
        November 11, 2014

        I think it’s still a pretty unique graphic. It’s not that off, it’s just not as well explained as it could be. ๐Ÿ™‚

        Like

  7. dbp49
    November 9, 2014

    I think the whole concept of “fractals” was something that made me look at the whole universe in a different way. The idea that something as huge as a universe could be duplicated in form in something as small as an atom, and even beyond in both directions. I’m doing a lousy job of explaining it so it’s just another of those things that you’ll have to “Google on Bing” I guess.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 9, 2014

      I love fractals and the related ideas that spring to mind when thinking about them. So cool! I like to think of all the stars and planets in the universe being part of an organism or object of its own, if you zoom out far enough.

      Like

      • dbp49
        November 9, 2014

        Exactly. Btw, the video was great (I forgot to mention that earlier). You take care now, and we’ll read you soon.

        Like

  8. sula362
    November 9, 2014

    great video. Thanks for that

    Like

  9. Hazel
    November 9, 2014

    I cannot believe that this is real. It’s unbelievably beautiful.

    Like

  10. Elyse
    November 9, 2014

    I do love science. Because when you’re open to it, Wonders never cease! Like this amazing video! I found you through PsiFiGal’s reblog.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 9, 2014

      Nice, thanks for mentioning that, it’s good to know. This has been my most reblogged post so far. I’m not surprised, either. I came across the video b/c someone shared it on Facebook and I just had to pass it along.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Elyse
        November 9, 2014

        I always wonder how folks find me!

        Like

  11. Sally Ember, Ed.D.
    November 9, 2014

    beautiful! Thanks for posting! Shared!

    Like

  12. PsiFiGal
    November 9, 2014

    Reblogged this on Dear Diary and commented:
    This blows my mind, thanks to The Honking Goose for posting this, go to her site and like it and comment there.

    Like

  13. PsiFiGal
    November 9, 2014

    I am so going to re-blog this! My mind was blown the first time I heard about dark matter. I can’t even explain it, but I think I understand it, a teeny tiny bit. Here’s a Ted Talk about it: http://www.ted.com/talks/patricia_burchat_leads_a_search_for_dark_energy#t-17616

    Like

    • PsiFiGal
      November 9, 2014

      Oh, and dark energy!

      Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 9, 2014

      I want to say the Universe is so magical. But is it magic or is it science? Or can that possibly be the same thing?

      Like

  14. rabbiadar
    November 9, 2014

    I remember in 1972 I was invited to a science event at Vanderbilt University. My all-girls high school did not particularly encourage interest in the sciences, but I somehow got elected as our representative to the event. A gentleman gave a presentation on the workings of the brain (I came home with “chlorinesterase” and “acetylchlorinesterase” as my shiny new vocabulary words) but the thing that blew my mind was something else. I realized that all the things I thought I “knew” in common with everyone else were really an agreement to call our perceptions by the same name. That carried me off into other realms, and I won’t bore you with the details, but it’s part of why I’m a rabbi today.

    Like

    • rabbiadar
      November 9, 2014

      Yikes. That should be “cholinesterase” and “acetylcholinesterase.” Those shiny vocabulary words rust if you don’t use them often enough.

      Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 9, 2014

      Yes, isn’t that interesting? A large proportion of learning a new discipline is learning the vocabulary that accompanies it. And it’s amazing how much our world can open up just with having new words to describe and discuss it.

      Like

  15. bck1402
    November 8, 2014

    It takes a long time for us three-dimensional beings to break free of two dimensional perception or thinking. A lot of what we learn in school tends to be flat be it on paper or on a screen that the depth of the matter sometimes gets away from us.
    I always thought it was weird that all the planets would be aligned in a row along the same plane when there was so much space to move in any direction – like electrons around a nucleus.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      What you say is very true. And it is quite perceptive of you to question the way it was presented (planar rotation). Education (and especially public education) really needs to embrace more of the spirit of inquiry.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. mjmsprt40
    November 8, 2014

    If you stop to think about it, it all kind of fits.

    We go around the sun.

    The sun, in its turn, goes around the center of the Milky Way Galaxy.

    The galaxy, in its turn, is also traveling through space.

    So– the idea of traveling in a corkscrew motion is not at all far-fetched, but is probably a fair representation of what is actually happening.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      Yup. As soon as I saw it, it clicked. Like, yeah, that’s it. Like a puzzle piece I didn’t even know was missing.

      Like

      • mjmsprt40
        November 9, 2014

        And here you were saying you never got to go anyplace. (grin.)

        Like

        • thehonkinggoose
          November 9, 2014

          Yeah, sitting around on my butt isn’t as lazy as I thought after all! ๐Ÿ˜‰

          Like

  17. carolyninjoy
    November 8, 2014

    Reblogged this on Reviews & Recommendations and commented:
    This is awesome. Dare I say stellar? ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

  18. Very Bangled
    November 8, 2014

    Maybe this is new knowledge? Or recent within the past 15 years?

    Human reproduction blew my mind. The process is way more interesting and complex then what they presented in biology class. A human’s chance of reproducing is only 15-20% success rate at the ideal age and ideal “environment”. It’s kind of amazing that we as a species exist.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      On that note, pregnancy always seemed like the most normal, natural thing to me growing up. I wanted to have kids so much. And then when I actually got pregnant it seemed like the weirdest thing ever. A human was growing inside me. An actual person, living off of me, and then growing, and then needing to come out. So bizarre.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Very Bangled
        November 8, 2014

        It is freaky to think of it that way. You were a host to a multi cell organism who became a person who plays video games. Mind blowing. No, I’m not stoned right now.

        Like

  19. theowllady
    November 8, 2014

    Reblogged this on theowlladyblog.

    Like

  20. weight2lose2013
    November 8, 2014

    What changed my world? This:
    http://www.npr.org/2014/11/03/361069820/new-clock-may-end-time-as-we-know-it
    Now, I won’t wear a wristwatch or get to work on time. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      My husband and I were just talking about time the other night — across the board all people perceive time in a nonlinear fashion, yet we measure time in a strictly linear fashion. Which can create such a disconnect.

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Yoshiko
    November 8, 2014

    The interesting results from plugging cables and playing with words are the things that blew my mind.

    Like

  22. John
    November 8, 2014

    fascinating!! Never thought of this but it must be true. ๐Ÿ’Ÿ

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      At first I was like, wait is this for real? And then I was like, yeah, it must be. And I didn’t bother doing any further research. :/

      Like

  23. Let's CUT the Crap!
    November 8, 2014

    This is indeed mind blowing. Hard to look away from the screen. ๐Ÿ˜ฎ Can’t get my head around it but it’s fantastic.

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      Isn’t it? I just feel totally different about my relationship to the rest of the universe now. It looks like the planets are playfully chasing each other and the Sun across the galaxy. It is so ALIVE! ๐Ÿ˜€

      Like

  24. The Story Reading Ape
    November 8, 2014

    Reblogged this on Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog….. An Author Promotions Enterprise! and commented:
    Intellectually you may have known this – but this video SHOWS it!
    Please don’t be afraid – it’s been happening for a long time and we’re still here.
    For now ๐Ÿ˜€

    Like

  25. Norbert Haupt
    November 8, 2014

    Reblogged this on Norbert Haupt and commented:
    I have posted before about the motions of the Earth in My Coffee Cup is Moving before. The post below illustrates two of these motions, the motion of the planets around the sun, and the sun within the galaxy.

    Like

  26. Opinionated Man
    November 8, 2014

    Because the level of thought when applied to dimensional physics and science is far too high for normal humans. At least the “normal ones” in my schools lol. ๐Ÿ˜‰

    Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 8, 2014

      Not trying to educate someone because of the possibility they might not fully understand is a self fulfilling prophecy if I ever heard one. Not that I disagree with you, just that it is a disappointing truth.

      Like

      • Opinionated Man
        November 8, 2014

        It is very disappointing lol. Almost as much as the kids that refuse to learn and claim it is because ” they won’t be judged by a grade or number.” Ok… Be judged by laziness instead! LoL

        Like

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This entry was posted on November 8, 2014 by in Nerd Corner and tagged , , , , , , , , , .
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