The Honking Goose

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Standing Rock Update November 29th


Good morning, beautiful people. The water protectors are still standing strong at Oceti Sakowin, North Dakota. Winter has set in with a thick blanket of snow and freezing temperatures.

Standing Rock camp in November 2016

camp earlier in November before the snow

I am not an expert; I’m not a reporter or a researcher. If this topic is of interest to you, please seek out more information on your own as well. I am passing on some information that has come my way today. Starting with a video, taken with a drone camera, an aerial view of the Oceti Sakowin water protector camp in North Dakota.

The water protectors are guarding sacred land as well as the Missouri River which is the primary water resource of the Standing Rock Sioux. The federal government has repeatedly violated treaty agreements as well as the legal agreement to consider off-reservation resources that the tribe depends upon. The Dakota Access Pipeline violates those agreements and the water protectors are peacefully assembled to permanently stop the pipeline from being constructed under the Missouri River.

From an article on Slate.com

“The reservation established by the Treaty of Fort Laramie of 1851, for example, included extensive lands that would be crossed by the pipeline. Although the government soon violated provisions of both that 1851 treaty and the Treaty of Fort Laramie 1868, the tribe may still have outstanding claims. In addition, various federal laws have been promulgated precisely to give the tribes a role in decisions affecting tribal resources off-reservation”

I also found this of interest this morning, originally posted on November 3, a list of requests for people participating in the Standing Rock camp:

IF YOU ARE COMING TO STANDING ROCK…
We’ve had a HUGE Influx of people suddenly – mostly white and there are some things you should know…

1) No drugs or alcohol… This is not burning man or a festival. Do not bring your party at the expense of these peoples fight for life and death.
2) Remain in prayer 100% of the time – this is a peaceful gathering and one that needs to be treated with the same respect you would hold in a church space.
3) YOU ARE NOT ON VACATION – this is not a camping trip – if you come for god sakes HELP OUT! Carry something, cook something, clean something.
4) Realize you are not going to “Save the day” – your donations will be taken and added to the stores but it’s no heroes welcome. Be ready for that. However, we are grateful for what you bring – if you want a Thankyou hug, come find me or Regina!
5) Nobody wants to hear your songs with your guitar or drum around the fire – unless you are asked to perform, don’t do it. Along the same lines of how you would conduct yourself in church or a ceremony space. Just break out in song? I don’t think so.
6) Find and talk to the elders – they are so wonderful and calming to be around! They are the pillars of this community and getting to know them has been one of the most rewarding experiences of my time here.

DISCLAIMER – I know this may sound harsh but it’s what we are experiencing here. We need this to be very clear so take time to understand the traditions and Native ways before arrival.

I wanted to share that because it gave me an increased understanding of the culture of the Oceti Sakowin camp at Standing Rock. I hope you find that of interest as well.

If you would like more information, ways to help, or where to donate, please visit the official website of Oceti Sakowin Camp.

And if you want to talk about it, let’s do that in the comments section: honk at us!

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25 comments on “Standing Rock Update November 29th

  1. dbp49
    December 4, 2016

    Correcting my last comment: Sorry! As of December 4th (I originally said the 2nd). I can’t help it…I’m very excited!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. dbp49
    December 4, 2016

    As of Dec.2 (I must be late seeing this post) the Army Corps has denied the permits. For now at least (until we see what Trump does when he takes office) The Standing Rock Sioux, and all those who have stood with them, are VICTORIOUS. Take that one Goliath!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. michelle213norton
    December 3, 2016

    All in the name of fostering dirty fuel. It’s not like it’s for us. They just want to sell it overseas to 3rd world countries as we see the rise of clean energy over here. Sad!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      December 3, 2016

      In either case, the citizens who are endangered by pipeline breaks and spills will still see none of the profits; the oil executives will get it all. Disgusting!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. joey
    November 29, 2016

    This is such a malevolence, I can’t believe it’s still goin on. I read an email maybe an hour ago, that our UU minister is going to Standing Rock tomorrow and it makes me glad she can and will. How many people need to go before it’s understood that this, and particularly the response to protest, is not okay?!?

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      December 1, 2016

      “and particularly the response to protest, is not okay”

      Man oh man, I’m so worried about the response to the water protectors, because it belies the greater injustices at work in our society. They are undertaking a beautiful, and powerful journey to protect this natural resource. And they are living in a war zone while doing it. I think it’s very hard for people, even me, to understand and remember that. They are constantly subjected to bright lights and loud noises during the night, drones and planes flying overhead, armed officers, barricades, snipers on hills above them, and the threat that the government might step in and forcibly move them any time. It’s painful to think about. They don’t deserve to be treated this way.

      When the white, middle-class community of Bismark nearby objected to the pipeline going through their town, they didn’t have to put their bodies on the line to have the pipeline rerouted. Those in power conceded and chose to put the pipeline closer to the reservation instead. Un-fucking-believable dude.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. rugby843
    November 29, 2016

    I must be misinformed but I thought the protest initially started because the pipeline invaded and would destroy burial grounds.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. rugby843
    November 29, 2016

    Thank you for that birds eye view. I’d like to thank that person myself. I also like the section about the rules of the protest. Very important that the public sees that.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Jinny Snow
    November 29, 2016

    I’m not very smart, but I have found examples of pipelines breaking all over the U.S. Exon-Ark. 2013…..Calif.-2015….Yellowstone River-2015….Alabama-2016..and the one in Alabama killed a person…..At the very least, many lives were impacted negatively forever. They left many illnesses in their wake. Maybe I look at things differently since I am 82 yrs. old, but I look at the impact on human lives instead of monetary gain. When they tell people they have taken precautions to insure the pipeline won’t break, they are gambling on the lives and future of human beings, disregarding the past accidents….and the wisdom of the elders. Who gave them authority to do that? This is not to mention the recent powerful earthquakes which are happening in unusual places in the last few years. What is more dangerous, God’s nature or “human” promises? Count me still praying!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jinny Snow
      November 30, 2016

      I have said this many times before, but it bears repeating: The Mother Earth is a gracious hostess. God created her that way. She gives of her resources willingly, elaborately, but what amazes me is that there are still those who steal from her, sometimes violently.

      Liked by 1 person

      • thehonkinggoose
        December 3, 2016

        As someone who cares very much about protecting nature, it is difficult to fit into a society where blatant disregard for protecting nature is the status quo. It is often heartbreaking, and full of compromise. Still, if I make it to 82 and longer, like you, I will be glad for every blessed year.

        Like

    • thehonkinggoose
      December 3, 2016

      I watched a video of one of the pipeline executives talking about how hard it is to prevent human error of people digging into the ground and breaking the oil pipelines. (I think it was on the Daily Show with Trevor Noah) And still they put the pipelines in the ground! Unbelievable.

      Like

  8. Godless Cranium
    November 29, 2016

    Good post. I need to learn more about this. I’ve seen snippets from mostly far-left sort of news agencies. If nothing else, it would be great if Obama stepped in and did something. It seems like the government is trying its best to ignore the dire situation developing there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 29, 2016

      Obama visited the Sioux at the nearby reservation in North Dakota in 2014 and promised to help them and protect their indigenous rights. Now, the water protectors have asked him to step in and demand the pipeline be rerouted away from this location and his response was to say “we are going to let it play out” (or similar words to that effect). It’s a tough one though. Because his inaction appears to be a lack of support for the natives. But on the other hand, he has not engaged the US military to force the water protectors off of what is considered to be federal land (illegally stolen from the native tribes after the treaty agreements). So it is complex.

      Liked by 2 people

  9. Jinny Snow
    November 29, 2016

    I am still praying for the people who are suffering there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 29, 2016

      They want our prayers and they want us to write letters to our representatives in government as well. That is excellent. I wouldn’t think of them as suffering though (although as you know a few of them have) for the most part the water protectors and doing well and staying strong.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Pete
    November 29, 2016

    Does one sincerely believe that the pipeline company or the federal government would build a pipeline that they thought would pollute the water? I also observe from the video that everyone gathered there used a vehicle to get there, are those vehicles running on something other than gasoline? When faced with facts hypocrisy seems to rule our decisions and our nation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • thehonkinggoose
      November 29, 2016

      “Does one sincerely believe that the pipeline company or the federal government would build a pipeline that they thought would pollute the water?”

      YES. In fact, oil pipelines frequently do break and pollute water and land. This article 220 ‘Significant’ Pipeline Spills Already This Year Exposes Troubling Safety Record describes some of those spills and the pollution they have caused.

      “I also observe from the video that everyone gathered there used a vehicle to get there, are those vehicles running on something other than gasoline?”

      I understand your point. It is not an easy decision to make to drive a vehicle to an oil pipeline protest. However, it is incredibly difficult to stop driving cars today. A hundred years of government spending on automobile infrastructure has given us the car culture we have today. As well as a vast deficit of efficient communal transportation modes like trains, buses, and subways. So YES, it is okay that the water protectors drove vehicles to get there. We need our government to shift infrastructure investments away from oil to alternative fuels. These are the people encouraging the government to make a necessary and positive change for the well-being of everyone.

      Liked by 1 person

    • rugby843
      November 29, 2016

      Would you believe the federal government would bomb a hospital in a foreign land?

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Mr. Militant Negro
    November 29, 2016

    Reblogged this on The Militant Negro™.

    Liked by 1 person

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This entry was posted on November 29, 2016 by in Culture, Politics and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , .
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